Tag Archives: CME

147. Recurring Homologous Solar Eruptions in NOAA AR 11429

Contributed by Suman Dhakal. Posted on October 14, 2020

Through studying three homologous eruptive events in an active region, the authors conclude that shearing motions and magnetic flux cancellation play a dominant role leading to the recurrent eruptions, and are key processes forming the eruptive structures.

121. The Origin of Major Solar Activity: Collisional Shearing between Nonconjugated Polarities of Multiple Bipoles Emerging within Active Regions

Contributed by Georgios Chintzoglou. Posted on February 28, 2019

Magnetic flux of opposite polarities belonging to two different emerging/emerged bipoles inside multipolar magnetic regions, can experience “collisional shearing”, a process resulting in strong shearing and fast cancellation of magnetic flux near the polarity inversion line. This type of flux cancellation is found to be the cause of a succession of major flares and CMEs in complex active regions.

113. What Makes CME-producing Solar Eruptions Happen?  Insight from Coronal Jets

Contributed by Alphonse Sterling. Posted on September 28, 2018

Jets resulting from eruption of minifilaments have lots of similarities to CMEs resulting from eruptions of large-scale filaments. This study on occurrences of jets can shed light on our understanding of what causes CME eruptions.

99. A Comparative Study between A Failed and A Successful Eruption Initiated from the Same Polarity Inversion Line in AR 11387

Contributed by Lijuan Liu. Posted on May 22, 2018

Two flares occurred in a same active region above a same polarity inversion line, but one had a failed CME eruption but another one had a successful CME eruption. This study explored why that was the case.

90. A Comparative Study of the Eruptive and Non-Eruptive Flares Produced by the Largest Active Region of Solar Cycle 24

Contributed by Ranadeep Sarkar. Posted on March 18, 2018

AR12192, the largest active region in Solar Cycle 24, produced 6 X-class flares, but none of them were associated with a CME. However, a much weaker flare, of M4.0-class, was associated with a CME. Magnetic field and morphological changes are analyzed during these flares to understand why this is the case.