Tag Archives: flares

174. Toward Improved Understanding of Magnetic Fields Participating in Solar Flares: Statistical Analysis of Magnetic Fields within Flare Ribbons

Contributed by Maria Kazachenko. Posted on February 24, 2022

Through analyzing a number of active regions, this analysis finds that while flares are guided by the physical properties that scale with AR size, CMEs are guided by mean properties, with little dependence on the amount of shear at the polarity inversion line or the net current.

173. Buildup of the Magnetic Flux Ropes in Homologous Solar Eruptions

Contributed by Rui Wang. Posted on February 17, 2022

This analysis shows that a new bipolar emergence, whose positive polarity collided with the pre-existing negative polarity, in AR11283 led to energy and helicity buildup in the form of magnetic flux ropes. Recurrent energy releases caused a few homologous CMEs from this region.

171. Flare-induced Sunquake Signatures in the Ultraviolet as Observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

Contributed by Sean Quinn. Posted on November 23, 2021

Sunquakes are helioseismic waves excited by solar flares, usually observed in the photosphere. However, some of these events are found to have their counterparts in the chromosphere, as observed in the SDO/AIA UV channels.

167. White-light Continuum Observation of the Off-limb Loops of the SOL2017-09-10 X8.2 Flare: Temporal and Spatial Variations

Contributed by Junwei Zhao. Posted on October 28, 2021

An unprecedented observation of a limb flare in HMI’s white-light continuum shows that the white-light intensity at the post-flare loop-top continues to grow for 16 more minutes while UV/EUV intensities decay. Both the WL/UV intensity and the EUV intensities show quasi-periodic pulsations with a period close to 8.0 and 6.8 minutes, respectively.

147. Recurring Homologous Solar Eruptions in NOAA AR 11429

Contributed by Suman Dhakal. Posted on October 14, 2020

Through studying three homologous eruptive events in an active region, the authors conclude that shearing motions and magnetic flux cancellation play a dominant role leading to the recurrent eruptions, and are key processes forming the eruptive structures.